"Free and critical minds can emerge only by a return to the source-the primary sources. A free and critical mind takes nothing for granted and is not intimidated by "authorities" who frequently may be more confused than the general public. Free and critical minds seek truth without chauvinism or shame." - Dr. Asa G. Hilliard III (1)



Continuously nutrition pieces of your minds and health must follow.


“One single bit of information, if missing, incomplete, out of order or just plain wrong, has the potential to significantly alter thought processes, conclusions, decisions and behaviors, even when that one single logic entry exists in a sea of accuracy.”

Sunday, April 19, 2009

Vicarious Reader of Poetry


The hardest part of writing is living. Living also incites the imagination. The second hardest part of writing is extracting understanding from living.

Doing the first and second parts, opens the portal to poetry. The writer trustingly takes the extended hands of living and meaning and follows life through the opening no matter the size or lighting.

The vicarious reader follows. They are also wonder seeking.

5 comments:

  1. I really like what you are doing, and so yes, I would love to feature on your blog.

    Feel free to add 'For Matt' and one other of your choice to Writer's Whirlpool- just link it all back to WALLS COME DOWN. I'll leave it up to you how much of my profile you want to include...

    I appreciate your appreciation!

    Nathan

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  2. I'm a lover of poetry but when trying to express my thoughts via poetry I can never quite catch or understand what type of rhythum should be used. I think about the audience too much and if they will "get it". So I choose to keep it to myself. I think my words or ideas make sense but my style often comes across as flat no matter what. Okay here's a little piece of something I did. Don't want to give the whole thing.

    "There is no one I know except me
    Thoughts roll by, ages pass, in
    one thousand silences a day
    I see and breath what others don't see
    Perhaps nature is my fools idolatry
    Pretending to know only what it wants to be"

    I could go on but it doesn't make sense to me and seems to lack life, I will continue to read over your methods and share. Thanks. Hey do you have a spell check on here?

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  3. Sounds like you have read How To Write A Poem."1. The rhythm must evolve from the words, the mood, the feeling of the poem itself. Let it emerge from the core thoughts, words, lines and verses - similar to a chorus or song "hook."

    2. Write first and stay true to the voice of the poem and the audience will find you.

    3. This is an interesting piece you've shared. Holds promise once fully emerged. I'm feeling deep sadness and misunderstanding. I feel tears over many years. I feel a spiritual awareness that has not been enough for the entire soul. Seems like it needs a blank line after the third line because of a new but similar thought.

    4. Here are some questions to ask yourself when trying to "bring it to life." What is the central motivation for this poem? What are the working titles? What does each line really mean, feel like? Freely write down the answers to these questions and share the secrets and details on paper with yourself. What comes to your mind, your emotions and your senses when you read each line as a whole and then each major word separately?

    5. Study the poem drafts on the link above to see why I made certain changes and decide whether you think it helped or hindered. Ask yourself did the change help the central idea and theme of the poem? This whole process is about practicing capturing feelings, emotions and sensory details. The thoughts and words will come if you keep with it, find places of silence and stillness to "meditate" on the driving forces within the poem and trust the spirit to show you the truth. Live!

    6. Nope, no spell check. Sometimes I'll type a comment in a word processor then paste it to the Internet.

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  4. Thank you for the additional insight.

    I think the last statement in point number 3 will help point 1 although I am uncertain if the mood revealed in my piece is consistent throughout or complete.
    How does one know when a poem is finished? Some are longer (Glorious Evening) others shorter (Restless Moon).

    Also when I come across a good line or phrase, I have trouble sacrificing it for the sake of the piece such as your omitted phrase "too tired from tried.." Good line , hated to see it go because I felt it accented all of your cited experiences. If it has stayed perhaps it would have changed the overall theme. Either way it had to be a tough choice to make.

    Your suggestions have encouraged me to do more exploring, thinking and writing.

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  5. I think the last statement in point number 3 will help point 1...Yes! You realized it, became aware of it without it being said specifically. In this manner, step by step will things be revealed and then sometimes, all at once....although I am uncertain if the mood revealed in my piece is consistent throughout or complete.You are certain that it isn't because if you were certain that it was, you wouldn't be uncertain.How does one know when a poem is finished?I will attempt to answer this in a post in 2 to 4 weeks. By that time you will probably know the answer already.Some are longer (Glorious Evening) others shorter (Restless Moon).Length is of no consequence to the merits of what a poem is. Let the communication of the idea be the most important thingAlso when I come across a good line or phrase, I have trouble sacrificing it for the sake of the piece such as your omitted phrase "too tired from tried.." Good line , hated to see it go because I felt it accented all of your cited experiences. If it has stayed perhaps it would have changed the overall theme. Either way it had to be a tough choice to make.A good line does not make a poem unless it falls into line with the rest. Save the good lines in a separate document or move them to the bottom of the page but either way, get them out of the way. There's plenty more where those lines come from and especially ones you need for the poem you're working with.

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