"Free and critical minds can emerge only by a return to the source-the primary sources. A free and critical mind takes nothing for granted and is not intimidated by "authorities" who frequently may be more confused than the general public. Free and critical minds seek truth without chauvinism or shame." - Dr. Asa G. Hilliard III (1)



Continuously nutrition pieces of your minds and health must follow.


“One single bit of information, if missing, incomplete, out of order or just plain wrong, has the potential to significantly alter thought processes, conclusions, decisions and behaviors, even when that one single logic entry exists in a sea of accuracy.”

Tuesday, June 8, 2010

Gardening - The Hardest Part

Something In The Water

Going outside soon after rain ceases is a time of heightened anticipation. Even if it's still cloudy and temperatures are cooler, plants have progressed noticeably. Seeds, leaves, blossoms and fruit have taken giant steps forward with mother's and father's blessings. I try to remain aware of when it's likely to rain so I won't get in the way of this process by using processed water (tap water) instead.

Rain and shine then rain and shine is optimal for many plants - at least the ones I have, especially the young ones. The young always thrive with a lot of natural love. I get excited when the forecast indicates an every other day or partial day of rain. This elation starts to crescendo when the wind turns up leaves or an expanse of darkness approaches or the perfume in the air invokes a refreshing memory of rain or all three. If I've just scattered seeds, they are destined for a quicker, stronger start.

After an early drenching rain today, I stepped into the backyard. I discovered nine more tomato plants growing all over the garden. Tomatoes have so much resiliency. Several were growing in the midst and shade of other plants. This is another example of why "weeding" to the nth degree seems most unnecessary. I will honor the growth of these thirteen tomato plants to show my appreciation and to experiment again with how much soil space a plant really needs, especially annual edibles. I did cut some of the limbs of nearby plants to allow more exposure to sunlight of these self restarters. This could very well be, The Year Of The Tomato.

There have been many other types of plants popping up all over the yard. Since this is the natural, inevitable way, this year is one of letting things grow where they choose as much as possible. I try to work around these proactive plants in the garden and cut around them in the grass. I'm excited about the single seed growing under the apple tree. Continue to listen to your natural mind it seems to be saying. This new arrival obtained enough nutrition to rise up in shin high grass. This flower must be a fierce competitor to be able to steal nutrients away from an established tree and thick grass. All three are doing fine.

Even though it probably has more to do with the effect of rain on organisms in the soil, there's something in rainwater that is so wonderful for plants. In most cases, rain is more pure than tap water. Plants don't need a lot of the extra, unintended stuff we offer them. They do need as much stuff from natural sources as possible. Lastly, plants don't need us doing a lot of tinkering with prescribed methods and processes. Staying out of the way, if anything, is the hardest part of gardening.

See Also:
Natural World Observations: Going Wild Like A Flower In Spring Breaking Free
Growing Food: Green Thumb Not Required But Three Things Are. Food Fight #51 – Another Grown-Folks Misconception

2 comments:

  1. I have my first cherry tomatoes this week from my plants Tom and Jerry today, yes I name my plants and flowers it helps them grow! Part of that is the rain water versus tap water. I have a jar to capture what natures provides on days Tom and Jerry and others are thristy and there is no rain in sight.

    I have a new plant growing amongst my herbs. I am not sure what is yet but is growing in strong.

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  2. Nothing but a smile creases my spirit hearing from another who is caring for nature in a connective way rather than a sterile, scientific way.

    I can't wait for my first tomato. That first one eaten on the spot is scrumpdillyishous and floods all the senses.

    It is exciting indeed to watch nature unveil the surprises it has stored up in seeds in the soil!

    I just took a large onion that was sprouting in the fridge and snuggled it into the soil. I hope it flowers and seeds so I can see if I get a bunch of freebies next spring.

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