"Free and critical minds can emerge only by a return to the source-the primary sources. A free and critical mind takes nothing for granted and is not intimidated by "authorities" who frequently may be more confused than the general public. Free and critical minds seek truth without chauvinism or shame." - Dr. Asa G. Hilliard III (1)



Continuously nutrition pieces of your minds and health must follow.


“One single bit of information, if missing, incomplete, out of order or just plain wrong, has the potential to significantly alter thought processes, conclusions, decisions and behaviors, even when that one single logic entry exists in a sea of accuracy.”

Monday, March 25, 2013

Genetic Determinations: Sickle Cell Anemia & Thalassemia, Same Terminology Context As Twice Before And So Continues The Meaning Of Life & Existence (Part 7a)

Read Part 1 - ”All Ways To Communicate Begin With Definition & Context And So Begins The Meaning Of Life & Existence” (Part 1)

Some anemias are caused by hemoglobin disorders. These disorders are inherited and genetic. By six to twelve months after birth, (2)(9) there are two active hemoglobin proteins (9) – alpha and beta. Thalassemia occurs when one of these is defective. (1)(2)
1. Alpha Thalassemia is caused by a gene that affects alpha-globin. (1)(2)
2. Beta Thalassemia is caused by a gene that affects beta-globin. (1)(2)
3. By reason, since Sickle Cell is a hemoglobin disorder and there are only two hemoglobin proteins, Sickle Cell must be the result of a gene that affects either alpha-globin or beta-globin. It turns out that Sickle Cell Anemia is caused by the gene that affects beta-globin.(3)(4) Since defective beta-globin meets the criteria for Thalassemia, Sickle Cell Anemia must be a form of Beta Thalassemia.

All Hemoglobin Disorders Cause Red Blood Cells To Look Different

According to the National Library of Medicine (NLM), certain genetic defects cause the blood cells to take on abnormal shapes (such as sickle cell anemia and thalassemia).(5) This is corroborated by the Mayo Clinic (6), by NLM again via Pubmed.gov (7) and by the following paraphrased information from Innvista.com. (8)

Anemias can be classified using two basic approaches:
a) Etiology: the causes of red blood cell and hemoglobin depletion [Thalassemia].
b) Morphology: the changes in the red blood cells, size, shape, and color [Sickle Cell]. (8)

These causes and changes result in the following anemias:
a) Thalassemia – smaller than normal cell size and abnormally low concentration of hemoglobin. (8) This is the morphological description but “Thalassemia” is an etiological classification.
b) Sickle cell anemia – normal cell size and sufficient or normal amounts of hemoglobin but an irregular shape. (8) This is the morphological description and sickle cell is a morphological classification.

If Alpha Thalassemia, Beta Thalassemia and Sickle Cell Anemia were named consistently, the names would be:

Based on Etiology (the cause/origin of the disorder)
1. Alpha Thalassemia
2. Beta Thalassemia Type 1
3. Beta Thalassemia Type 2

Based on Morphology (the changes that result from the disorder)
1. Stunted Pale Cell Anemia Type A
2. Stunted Pale Cell Anemia Type B
3. Sickle Cell Anemia

Conclusions

Alpha Thalassemia and Beta Thalassemia are caused by mutations of different genes, yet they are named similarly. Beta Thalassemia and Sickle Cell are caused by mutations of the same gene, yet they are named differently. Sickle Cell is placed in a separate category all by its lonesome. What is the medical purpose of such a clear inconsistency? Could this simply be an honest medical or scientific mistake nobody has caught for decades?

Answers to the above question are easily found by realizing these hemoglobin disorders are inconsistently separated based on etiology versus morphology which then allows the dominant groups the disorders affect to be consistently separated. If there's another reasonable answer, please share. This type of naming strategy is the same terminology context detailed on March 20, 2013 regarding using different names for the same period of time, in Alkebu-lan and Europe.

I'll answer my own questions. The only possible reason for choosing names for hemoglobin disorders from two different classification systems is nefarious and diabolical. The history of this behavior goes way back as has already been indicated in Expanded Definitions: Prehistory & Prehistoric Context And So Continues The Meaning Of Life & Existence (Part 3).

On many websites, Sickle Cell is more often paired with the word “disease” than Thalassemia. Also many sites refer to Sickle Cell as “chronic” but not Thalassemia, even though both are chronic. Sickle sounds like sick(ness) is just in the cells of some folks but not others. It makes it seem that sickness is a part of your heritage and divine punishment. ”Go to health,” my cells tell me. "It's the worldview you're listening to that's keeping you sick. Break that habit and anything genetic is more manageable, and, in many cases, healable and preventable. On the flip side, start new habits and things genetic are more powerful, and, in many cases, multipliable and unstoppable. Let her and him that hath history hear."

Bottom Line Conclusion

Alpha Thalassemia, Beta Thalassemia and Sickle Cell Anemia are each a form of Anemia and each a form of Thalassemia. Different classifications lead to discrimination in insurance coverage and treatments.

Related:
Health & Nutrition: Information Stupid
Patient-Centered Care, Hillary Clinton's Blood Clot, Concussion & An Insult To Common Sense
Food Fight #1: Fixing The Fight!
In Registered Dieticians Not Trust

Read Part 7b - Health Information Simplification, Nutrition, Sunlight, Iron Deficiency & Comprehensive Approach Context And So Continues The Meaning Of Life & Existence (Part 7b)

Notes:
(1) Medline Plus, Thalassemia, U. S. National Library of Medicine, National Institute of Health, Accessed 3/21/13, Click here for more information.
(2) Harvard University, Hemoglobin Synthesis, Information Center For Sickle Cell and Thalassemic Disorders, Harvard Medical School, April 14, 2002, Accessed 3/22/13, Click here for more information.
(3) Genetics Reference Home, Sickle cell disease, National Library of Medicine, Accessed 3/22/13, Click here for more information
(4) Information Center For Sickle Cell and Thalassemic Disorders, How does Sickle Cell Cause Disease, Harvard Medical School, April 11, 2002, Accessed 3/22/13, Click here for more information
(5) Medline Plus, Hemolytic anemia, U. S. National Library of Medicine, National Institute of Health, Accessed 3/22/13, Click here for more information.
(6) The Mayo Clinic, Thalassemia, Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research., Accessed 3/23/13, Click here for more information.
(7) Pubmed.gov, Quantitative changes of red blood cell shapes in relation to clinical features in beta-thalassemia/HbE disease, U. S. National Library of Medicine, National Institute of Health, Accessed 3/22/13, Click here for more information.
(8) Innvista, Anemia Types, Innvista.com, Accessed 3/23/13, Click here for more information
(9) haematologica, Mechanism of human Hb switching: a possible role of the kit receptor/miR 221-222 complex, the Hematology Journal, Ferrata Storti Foundation (2013), Accessed 3/24/13, Click here for more information

No comments:

Post a Comment

See Comment Policy Below